Walk Boldly Into This Season


Last week I received an email from my cousin Kelsey with the message, “I think you’ll be blessed for your boldness in the season you’re walking into.” Now that is a set of beautiful words! Blessed. Boldness. Season. Walking into. I’ve shared this sentence with multiple people and each person has derived their own meaning from it, just as I imagine you are now thinking about what it means for you in this season of your life. Here are my thoughts.


I equate blessed with gratitude. Living blessed is shifting from a mindset of scarcity to abundance. Choosing to focus on what I have in my life instead of what is missing. Looking for evidence of beauty, belonging, and love. Taking the moments to savor joy, sink into the feeling, and imprint it in my mind. Benedictine monk David Steindl-Rast said “It’s not joy that makes us grateful, but gratitude that makes us joyful.” Create the space for gratitude and you will be blessed.


One of my favorite quotes and a life motto is “If you ask me what I came into this world to do, I will tell you: I came to live out loud.” (Emile Zola). This is my definition of boldness – life out loud. Boldness is not a lack of fear. It is walking forward with the fear. Bringing forth the courage held deep in our hearts to follow what we are called to do.


Green grass and flowers are a long way off in Minnesota, but we have turned the corner on winter. The days are getting longer. There are no subzero temperatures in the extended forecast. As the Earth transitions, so do we. There are seasons of rest and renewal and seasons of flurry and change. I am in a season of learning and growth, which is, inevitably, also a season of vulnerability. Every day I become aware of something I don’t know and skills I need to build. I am constantly reflecting on how I want to show up in the world, the relationships I want to create, and how I will generate impact with my life.

Walking Into

Dr. Michael Bernard Beckworth said on a recent SuperSoul Conversations podcast with Oprah, “Pain pushes until the vision pulls.” Pain can get us started on a new path. Sometimes it drags us kicking and screaming. And then, one day, we see the vision ahead and suddenly we are walking into the vision instead of running away from the pain. We actively move ourselves forward, taking steps into the life we desire.

Lay down your path of gratitude and walk boldly into this season, my friends.


Aligning Your Human Being and Human Doing


When I graduated from college I had no intention of entering the traditional workforce. I taught environmental education, guided camping trips with teenagers, and led semesters abroad with gap year students. I filled any downtime in employment with substitute teaching. A desire for roots and community brought me back to Minnesota for grad school. I applied for a summer internship at Cargill and I was surprised by how much I enjoyed it. I decided to stay. (And they decided to keep me!)

I look back at the last 10 years of my career with incredible gratitude. I still can’t believe some of the experiences I’ve had. My colleagues taught – and continue to teach – me lessons about courage, creativity, leadership development, coaching, and authenticity. I discovered that curiosity and listening are the keys to engaging and building trust with anyone, from a union leader in the middle of Ohio to an executive in Ecuador. I learned how to be vulnerable to give others the permission to learn and grow. I am here today because of these lessons.

Even through these amazing experiences, I always wondered if a full-time role in corporate America was the best place for me. Many of you have been reading my blog and know that I started to listen to that voice and seriously entertain the idea of entrepreneurship about a year ago. After much exploration and reflection, I put in my notice at work in July, went part-time in October, and my last day is Thursday.

Although I never felt like my life was particularly out of alignment, I have become increasingly aware over the past several months that I am now living in alignment. I am energized and inspired. I have never experienced this level of creativity. Amazing people are entering my life. The changing structure of my days fits my personality. The actual work I am doing and developing is aligned to my values, my skills, and the impact that I want to have. I am serving with my whole self. Life feels full of possibilities. It’s not easy, but it’s right.

My former leader at Cargill recently started a project called Significance Matters. On the website she and her husband have two different bios – their human doing bios and human being bios. Alignment is a collision between the human being and human doing. Instead of my being and doing existing separately or bumping into each other only occasionally, they are becoming one. This is the difference I feel.


What about you?

Most of the time we aren’t in vast misalignment. We tend to notice when our integrity is crossed or values blatantly violated. Subtle misalignment is harder to recognize and easy to ignore. It’s the boiled frog metaphor – if you drop a frog in boiling water it will leap out. But if you place a frog in cool water and slowly raise the temperature, it will boil to death without ever leaving the pot.

Are you in a pot with the temperature rising so slowly you don’t notice?

Are you like me? Generally happy with your life, but feeling like something is just a little off?

Pay attention to those sensations that tell you something is awry. Lean into the feeling. Get curious about it. Ask yourself where it is coming from. Do your best to withhold expectations or judgment from the response.

Once you recognize where you are out of alignment, you can make adjustments. Sometimes a big change is needed. Often more exploration. But just a tweak here and there will also help bring your human being and human doing closer together.

My Favorite Brené Brown Quotes

Sometimes I need a walk with a friend. Occasionally a hard spin class. Other times a glass of wine. And then there are days I just need a little Brené Brown. I listen to an interview with Brené or I open my copy of Daring Greatly and she simultaneously hugs my heart and gives me a kick in the ass. Her words remind me to embrace vulnerability and feel deeply. She gives me the courage to again bring my full self forward into the world.

Here are a few of my favorite Brené Brown quotes set against photos I’ve taken over the past several years. I hope they also give you a hug and the push you need to move forward.

Brené Brown quote on authenticity

I took this photo of the sun rising behind Uluru from Kata Tjuta, nearly 30 miles away from the giant rock. I look at this photo now, almost 5 years later, and I relive the feeling of standing under a massive sky and watching the day begin. It is a reminder to let go and be at peace with myself and the world.

Brené Brown quote on vulnerability

About halfway through my visit to the Chihuly Garden and Glass exhibit I realized that I could see the Seattle Space Needle reflected in Chihuly’s art. I love that this photo is both clear and blurred. It’s a little messy – just like vulnerability.

Brené Brown quote - live from our wild heart

A long staircase down a sheer cliff kept most of the tourists from this glorious beach along Great Ocean Road in Australia. It feels expansive and free – a place you can easily live from your wild heart.

Brené Brown quote on feedback

I was sitting on the roof of a boat watching the sunset in the Galápagos Islands when this bird soared overhead. He is definitely in the arena!

Brené Brown quote on belonging

A magnificent sunset in one of my favorite countries – Slovenia. I feel a gentle sense of belonging and connection in the world watching this man fish at dusk.

Brené Brown quote on numbing emotions

These branches reflected in the sand at Lover’s Key State Park in Florida are crisp and almost thorny, yet they are beautiful. They reminded me of the challenging emotions we need to embrace.

Making the time for joy

collage-2018-01-15 (2)

Two weeks ago I shared an activity I used to create timelines and tasks from the vision I have for my business. It was a practical tool to achieve concrete goals. But there’s another important goal in my life that I don’t want to put on a timeline – creating space for the activities that are guaranteed to bring me joy.

I’m lucky to have great relationships and a lot of fun in my life. Joy is the next level beyond fun. Joy is all encompassing happiness that seeps into my soul. For me, greater joy means amping up:

  • Live music. In November I saw Har Mar Superstar at the Turf Club. It was amazing. The beats pulsed through my entire body. I danced. I laughed. I turned to my friends in the middle and said, “I’m so happy.” I love how music instantly creates the feeling of community among strangers. I need more of this.
  • Really getting outside. I’m great an organizing outdoorsy activities in the city. Want to go biking to breweries? Walk around Lake of the Isles? Cross-country ski at Theodore Wirth? I’ll plan the route, send out the invite, and show up with bells on. But it’s been years since I went camping or hiked the North Shore. I want to go on a 10-mile hike, build a campfire, and see the Milky Way.
  • Community and real conversation. I have wonderful friends. We have a ton of fun cooking, traveling, and playing games. But I felt like there was a different aspect of community that I was seeking. In December I started attending Intertwine, a community designed to share stories, listen, reflect, and participate in meaningful conversation. It was exactly the gap I’d been looking to fill.
  • Mini-adventures. I tend to think of adventure in grand terms. It usually involves getting on a plane for at least 8 hours. This kind of adventure is really important to me, but it can only happen occasionally. I need that quick hit of energy from exploring new places, activities, and events closer to home. Two summers ago my mom and I took a day trip to Stockholm and Maiden Rock, Wisconsin. We ate quiche in a bakery, shopped in a cute boutique, wandered art galleries, had a great lunch, and sampled cider at Maiden Rock Winery and Cidery. I felt like I had a vacation! And I was gone for a total of 8 hours.


What will it take to make this happen? First and foremost, I will have to make it a priority to proactively get these activities on the calendar and round up people to join me (because a big part of my joy is the people!). I have already planned an overnight to Duluth in February. Intertwine events are a priority in my schedule. I’ll organize a camping trip once the weather is warmer and I’m keeping my eyes open for live music opportunities. I’m sure I will also have to say no to a few things in order to create room for these joy-filled activities.


Do you want to create more joy in your life? Consider the following:

  • What activities and environments bring you true joy? Think about moments where you lose track of time and revel in being alive in this world. When your body feels awake and your heart is free. It does not have to be grandiose. It might be playing the guitar, doing art projects with your kids, or biking around the lake.
  • What do you need to eliminate to make room for joy? Perhaps you need to stop participating in that book club that feels more like an obligation than fun. Trade 30 minutes on the elliptical for a dance class. Clear your calendar one weekend in June to make time for a family camping trip.
  • What is your mindset towards joy? Do you allow yourself to let go and experience joy? There’s a certain freedom and release in experiencing joy, but joy is also vulnerable. If you experience fear and hold back when joy creeps into your life, I recommend reading Brené Brown’s Daring Greatly or watching her Ted Talk on vulnerability. She has great ideas and reflections on the topic.

Cheers to creating more joy in 2018!

Create a plan for your dreams

Zig Ziglar Quote

It’s that time of year. Resolutions promised. Vision boards created. Business plans crafted. Performance and development goals set at work.

Do you want to make changes in 2018? Become a better version of yourself? Take a step (or leap!) towards achieving a dream? Instead of just thinking about change, make a plan to achieve it.

As most of you know, I am launching a business in coaching and facilitation while I write a book on getting the most out of development experiences at work. I am also writing a children’s book around mindfulness and emotional awareness – with ideas for more that I want to explore. I had general goals for my business and writing, but I knew that I needed to be much more specific so that it wouldn’t take years to get there – and so I would even know where “there” was! It is hard to hold yourself accountable to ambiguity.

In November I spent a few hours on the floor of my condo surrounded by index cards and Sharpies to make this happen. I followed a simple process to articulate my vision and then work backwards to goals and tasks that were easy to achieve. The only required materials are index cards and a pen – but feel free to add color and creativity as desired! Here you go!

Brainstorm your vision for 2018. Do you want to run a half marathon? Write a book? Start a side business? Write each idea on a separate note card.

If you are unsure of your vision, ask yourself:

  • What would a successful 2018 look like?
  • What could you change that would improve the quality of your life in 2018?
  • If you own a business, what targets will you achieve? What impact will you create for your clients?

Line up your goals. If you have more than 5, I recommend pairing them down. The fewer goals you have, the more likely you are to accomplish them. One goal complete is better than 10 goals left unfinished.

For each goal, ask yourself: What do I need to do by the end of June to accomplish this goal in 2018? Perhaps you run a 10K in preparation for the half marathon. Write 50,000 words of the novel you’re going to complete. Create a page on Etsy. Write each action on a notecard.

Now take it three months out – to the end of March 2018.

Repeat for the end of January 2018.

Finally, what do you need to do each week in January to reach your first set of milestones by the end of the month?

I had goals around writing my books, networking, building coaching clients and speaking engagements, and the logistics of running a business. I also included goal setting as a task to complete each weekend to make sure that I’m staying on track and adjusting my actions as needed throughout the year (or change my goals – that is also allowed!).

Finally, I got out masking tape and put them up on the wall – a visible reminder of my goals and what it will take to get there.

This process was a fantastic kick for me to get moving. It created structure, clarity, and process for goals that were too high-level and future focused to be attainable in the short-term. It motivated me to get moving TODAY. I hope it does the same for you! Cheers to achieving your dreams in 2018!

Three Steps to Getting Along With Your Family This Holiday

Notice, Ask, Listen

It’s that time of year. Cars are packed to go over the river and through the woods to Grandma’s house, airplanes travel to bring people home for a merry little Christmas, and we attend party after party in hopes of having the most wonderful time of the year.

Are you ready to enjoy it all?

Or are your boxing gloves out, ready to spar over Trump, #metoo, the tax bill, and the bleeding heart liberals/radical evangelicals/Democrats/Republicans that are ruining this country? Have you already constructed an argument to defend your career choice? Are you preparing biting remarks to counter questions about why you don’t have any children?

What if you took a different approach?

Shifted your mindset from judgment to learning?

Listened to understand instead of looking for holes in an argument?

Here are three steps to make this shift. I’m not going to say they’re easy. Your patience and resolve will be tested. But I’m certain they will help you know your family better and have a lower-stress holiday!


When you visit family and friends, pause and look at them. Really look at them. What is different from the last time you met? What emotions do you see in their face? Stop and notice “and this person you thought you knew will feel different and that person will respond to you differently,” mindfulness researcher Ellen Langer said on a recent OnBeing podcast. “And this happens instantly.”

Instant change simply by taking the time to notice? That’s something worth trying!


In September I spent two weeks in Croatia with three friends that I had collectively known for over 30 years. Instead of the usual chitchat during dinner, we decided to ask thought-provoking questions. Here is just a sample of our discussions:

  • What change could you make right now that would have an immediate impact on your life?
  • Is everyone capable of being a leader?
  • What three words would you use to describe the human race?
  • If you had to spend $10,000, what would you spend it on?

These questions led to more questions, personal stories and reflections. There was laughter, tears – and some disagreement! But I learned more about my friends in those two weeks than I had in the previous decades I had known them.

Not sure where to start? Get curious. What do you want to know about your family? The story of how your grandparents met? What it was like to for your aunt to live during the cultural tumult of the 1960s and how that compares to today? What your cousin loves about his job? Ask, and then….


Listening is not simply being quiet. It isn’t keeping your mouth shut while you internally formulate a rebuttal. It isn’t waiting for your turn to speak.

Listening is shifting the focus away from the thoughts running through your head and to the other person. Listen to their words, their tone, and their body language. Listen to understand their experience and perspective. Use your energy to purposefully give them your full attention.

There will be times when your emotions get the better of you. When your aunt asks if you’re ever going to get married at the same time the dog jumps on the table and starts eating the meat and your grandfather blames it on Obama. This will happen.

Before reacting, take a deep breath. This single moment is often enough to regroup and purposefully decide what to do next. Then:

  • Consciously switch back to noticing.
  • Instead of interrupting with your own point of view, ask, “How did you come that conclusion?”
  • Seek understanding by actively listening.

Notice, ask, listen, repeat and see what happens.

Happy holidays!

Further resources:

  • Braving the Wilderness by Brené Brown – A phenomenal book on belonging and rebuilding our communities through listening, authenticity, and courage.
  • Change Your Questions, Change Your Life by Marilee Adams – It has the appearance of a business book, but the content on shifting from judgment to learning and asking questions to seek understanding applies to every part of life.

A Letter To My Fear

Minneapolis sunrise

This past June was a month of uncertainty for me. I had internally decided to leave my job and become an entrepreneur, but I hadn’t actually pulled the trigger. About 90% of the time I was excited for the possibilities. The other 10% of the time I felt like someone had wrapped a corset around my lungs and pulled the strings tight. I questioned the sanity of my decision to leave my safe, steady job and pursue a path that could lead to failure. After all, I hadn’t actually quit my job. I could still change my mind.

But in my heart I knew that I couldn’t change my mind. I was already on this path. I was moving ahead and fear was just going to be part of the journey.

I remembered reading a letter that Elizabeth Gilbert had written to her fear in Big Magic and I decided to do the same. I had no intention of sharing this publicly, but a colleague suggested that it might help others to manage their fear.

It’s taken me five months to get the courage to share the letter. I feel vulnerable just typing this introduction. But I also believe that vulnerability is the key to growth, so here it is:

Heather – You are becoming the person that you want to be. Stepping fully into yourself. Expressing what you have to offer to the world. You are taking the time to design life on your own terms and release the expectations you have created for yourself or others have impressed upon you over many years. Heather, you are creativity, and when you reach into that creativity and act from your heart without ego, your light is unstoppable.

 And, Heather, you know that stepping into the light can be scary. Light exposes flaws, makes it harder to hide when things go poorly, all eyes on you. But remember when this fear washes over you and you feel vulnerable to the eyes of the world – a life in the light is also warm. It is open, illuminating, and free. It embraces your beauty and also your imperfections knowing that’s what makes you real. You’ve known for a long time that perfection is unattainable – it’s now time to act on that knowledge.

But the most important thing to remember, Heather, is that a life in the light isn’t about you at all. It is the light you give to others that matters. And only by stepping into the light and bathing yourself in its radiance do you have light to give to others. Overflowing radiance. What might be possible with overflowing radiance?

So when the fear creeps in and sucks the breath from your lungs and the energy from your heart, take a deep breath and turn towards the light, towards the possibilities, inward to your creativity and outward in overflowing radiance.

I’ve read this letter countless times since I wrote it in June. Whenever I feel the fear edge in, this letter gives me the pep talk I need to move forward with confidence. The fear doesn’t disappear entirely – and I wouldn’t want it to. A little fear gives me a sense of urgency and pushes me forward – into the light, into my creativity, and outward in overflowing radiance.

Growth mindset and fixed mindset: Which do you choose?

Hiking in Slovenia

As I thought about the research for my book on maximizing learning during development experiences, I immediately knew that I wanted to include something on growth mindset. The term kept popping up in Ted Talks, webinars, and articles and it seemed like a key to ongoing learning and success.

What is growth mindset?

In her book, Mindset: The new psychology of success, Carol Dweck writes, “growth mindset is based on the belief that your basic qualities are things you can cultivate through your efforts, your strategies, and help from others.” In other words, if you believe you can get better, smarter, faster AND you put effort into it – then you will.

Fixed mindset, on the other hand, is a belief that your intelligence, gifts, character, creative ability, etc are fixed and cannot be improved. We are born with a certain amount of innate talent and we cannot develop past that point.

Why does growth mindset matter? 

Carol Dweck’s research repeatedly links growth mindset and continued growth and success throughout life. She provides examples of people that we now view as experts in their field, like Michael Jordan, Albert Einstein, and Jackson Pollack, that didn’t show promise early in their careers. It was practice, effort, and experimentation that led to success.

This concept doesn’t just apply to world-renowned individuals. Dweck shares stories of kids that are taught the growth mindset and suddenly say “You mean I don’t have to be dumb?” After this realization, test scores improved rapidly. Belief in their abilities created a new reality.

My story

I’ve always been a learner. I enjoyed going to school, read with a flashlight under my bedcovers, and collected pond water to examine under the microscope I got for Christmas. I started this book assuming that I had a growth mindset. But as I read I realized that while I do have a growth mindset in my intellectual ability, there are other areas of my life where a fixed mindset is alive and well.

There’s one area where I shifted from a growth mindset as child to a fixed mindset in middle school and then again to a growth mindset as an adult – creativity.

I’m guessing many of you will identify with my story. As a child I painted and drew to my heart’s content. I never thought about whether my art was “good”. That changed in middle school when art class suddenly had rules and grades. It was immediately clear that I was not good. Art went from being fun and playful to something I avoided for years.

As I grew older my fixed mindset around art broadened to general creativity. Despite the fact that I wrote poems and loved taking photographs, I did not view myself as creative. My mindset told me that I wasn’t good at drawing and painting and therefore I wasn’t a creative person.

My entire attitude towards creativity changed with one conversation nine years ago. I was working on a global leadership development program and I had just pitched an idea to my manager. She looked at me and said, “Heather, you’re always saying that you want to be creative. You just conceptualized an entirely new module for our program. That IS creativity.”

For years I had equated creativity with my perceived failure in seventh grade art class. Suddenly I realized that the root of the word creativity is CREATE – and I did that all the time. That shift opened a whole new world for me. New ideas came to me with more frequency and ease. I looked at my photography as art. I didn’t just write curriculum for our programs at work – I created them.

I also took this growth mindset with me when I started to write a few years ago. Instead of thinking that I was either naturally “good” or “bad” at writing, I adopted an attitude of learning and enjoyment. I took classes, was open to feedback, and didn’t take myself too seriously. Not only has the quality of my writing improved, I’ve also written in styles that I never considered. I even have two silly poems that I’d like to turn into children’s books! I never would have written them in my fixed mindset state.

Your story

Where do you have a fixed mindset in your life? It might show up as a hidden saboteur, the little voice in your head telling you that you’ll never be good at public speaking or math or running. It may emerge as fear of taking on a big project at work or applying for a promotion. It could even appear as a limiting belief around dating, parenting, or belonging.

“We’ve found that whatever mindset people have in a particular area will guide them in that area.” Yes, we are born with certain abilities. But, as Dweck writes, it is curiosity, challenge, and effort that feed our abilities and cause us to learn, grow, and eventually succeed.

What might be possible for you with that mindset?

Belonging to the World

There are times when I feel like I belong nowhere, like I’ll never fit in. And then there are times when I feel like I belong everywhere all at once. When I sense the pulsing thread of humanity connecting me to every person on Earth. Those moments when I know our commonality is more powerful than any difference between us.

An experience from my recent trip to Europe epitomizes this feeling.

While in Bled, Slovenia I went on a tour through the Julian Alps. Our group of 17 consisted of families from Australia and Malta, couples from Malaysia and Britain, female friends from Singapore, our Slovenian guides, and me. We piled into two vans for a full day of hiking, waterfalls, and white-water rafting.

In hour eleven of our twelve-hour tour we shared a round of beer and loaded the vans onto a car train to return to our starting point in Bled.

I was in a van with the family from Malta (two college-aged daughters and their parents) and the couple from Malaysia. While our van chugged along the railroad tracks through the mountains, I started to ask questions about Malta, a place I knew nothing about. Soon one of the daughters was singing an old Maltese folk song about a pastry. It was recommended that I eat this pastry if I visit Malta, but I was warned to be careful how I asked for it because the word for the pastry also meant a certain body part it resembled.

We had a few laughs over that one. And that’s when the riddles, jokes, and one-minute mysteries started.

A few didn’t quite cross the language barrier.

“What has ears, but can’t hear?” one of the girls from Malta asked.

I paused. Nothing came to mind. “I give up. What is it?”

“A pot!”

No hint of recognition from me or the Malaysian couple. “Huh?”

Lesson learned – the Maltese word for the handles on a pot also means “ears.”

But most of them translated impeccably well. I had even told some to my students in the US when I taught environmental education years ago.

“What goes around the world but stays in a corner?” – A postage stamp!

“What has a head and a tail, but no body?” – A coin!

“You’re lost in the woods and you come upon a cabin with a candle, dry wood for a fire, and a kerosene lamp. You only have one match. What do you light first?” – The match!

The Maltese family and I also shared “Johnny, Johnny, Johnny, Johnny, Whoops” with the Malaysian couple. Who knew this silly game was played the same way in two countries 5,000 miles apart that spoke different languages?

There was so much laughter. It was the laughter of children playing child’s games even though there were no kids in the van. It was the joy of people from different corners of the globe recognizing similarity in each other. The freedom of being fully present, enjoying the company of strangers that felt like friends for a moment.

Two nights later I was sitting in a café in the small capital city of Ljubljana chatting with a couple from Texas while my waiter brought me his favorite Slovenian craft beers. The family from Malta happened to walk by and stopped to say hello. I stood up and gave each of them a hug. In that moment I felt like I could belong anywhere.

And so, in those times when I feel like the odd person out, like I’m weird and different and don’t fit in, or when it feels like division has more power than unity, I remind myself of the riddles in the back of the van. Of the collective belonging felt through laughter shared equally across continents, the simplicity of human connection, and the strength in our commonality.


NOTE: This blog post was equally inspired by my experiences in Slovenia and Brené Brown’s new book on true belonging, Braving the Wilderness and, in particular, the Maya Angelou quote she shared: “You are only free when you realize you belong no place – you belong every place – no place at all.”

Keeping the Faith

Slovenia Coast

On my last day in Slovenia I decided to do what I enjoy most: walk. I had walked all over Slovenia during my 10-day trip – on mountain paths to waterfalls, down country lanes past herds of sheep and cows, on boardwalks through gorges. This last trek was along the coast from Piran, where I was staying. I planned to follow a designated walking route north, do a short loop at the end of the trail, and walk back to Piran.

I missed the turn back. I saw it. I paused to consider whether I should turn there, but the trail markers I had been following for two and a half hours kept going down the coast. So I also kept going.

After a while I realized my mistake. I wasn’t lost. I knew I could turn around, but at that point turning around would mean walking for at least six hours. I could do it, but it didn’t sound fun.

So I kept walking forward. I could soon see a town in the distance on the coast. I was pretty sure it was Izola. We had stopped in Izola on my bus from Ljubljana to Piran, which meant if I could get there, then I would eventually be able to find my way back to Piran without having to walk for hours on end.

Hiking in Slovenia

I continued to follow the path along the ridge over the sea. Eventually the trail ended at a road. I kept walking down and forward. The road led to a park (with a much needed bathroom!). From the park there was a promenade along the ocean to a marina. From the marina I walked to the first road I saw and followed the signs pointing to the center of town (it was now clear that I was actually in Izola – yeah!). I walked a few blocks along the road and ran directly into the bus stop. I checked the schedule and the next bus for Piran was coming in 10 minutes.

I’ve thought a lot about this walk. What amazes me most is that I felt no fear. Here I was, walking alone in a foreign country where I didn’t speak the language, not entirely sure where I was or where I was going and yet I had complete confidence that it would work out.

We could use a fancy corporate term, like managing ambiguity, to describe my attitude that day, but it really comes down to one thing: faith.

How many times do we need to be reminded of keeping the faith? When the final job interview yet again doesn’t lead to an offer. When you want to be in a relationship and put yourself out there only to be rejected. When the pregnancy test comes back negative. When you’re launching a business, but haven’t landed your first client.

And yet I am reminded of the walk to Izola. Not only did faith lead me to the end I wanted, but it was a beautiful journey. The Adriatic Sea sparkled into infinity. Soft pale green olive trees twisted their branches creating artistic shadows in the grass. The sun shone brilliantly above me. I felt like I was walking in a Van Gogh painting.

Olive grove in Slovenia

I know the journey doesn’t always feel beautiful. Sometimes it’s heart wrenching. It is vulnerable being out there on a ridge, knowing what you want, but unsure when and how it’s going to happen.

But keep the faith. One foot in front of the other. You (and I) will get there eventually.